Posts by camaduke

Reader. Writer. I taught time management and study strategies at Appalachian State. I blog at camaduke.com.

You are a rock star

Today again I want to blog about one of the affirmations that helped me in the past. I have to admit that this title is actually a G-language version of the actual affirmation.

It might help to explain that I was at a point of transition in my life, shifting from one attempted career/life path to something new that I hadn’t yet fully identified. I didn’t quite articulate it then, but one source of concern was the awareness that I was not meeting the unstated (but well-advertised) standards of success for an adult. I didn’t have a car, let alone a fancy one (I didn’t want one). I didn’t live in an exciting city (I had, but I left). I didn’t go out for cocktails each night or brunch on the weekends with a group of dynamic, articulate, sparkling friends (I had a small circle of wonderful friends, and sometimes we played cards together). When I told people the jobs I had done as well as what I was considering for the future, I received blank or confused looks. My career/life goals didn’t fit their expectations.

I spent some time reflecting on why I had done what I had done, what I valued and what I didn’t value (cars and TV-viewing are actively harming our planet, imho), and how I had taken risks that led me to new and interesting places. Instead of feeling bad about myself for not fitting into other people’s expectations of success, I started to see what was courageous and ethical about my own choices. So I realized I should tell myself every day, girl, you are a rock star.

I have to admit that I’m a bit uneasy with this affirmation right now. I am still happy with what I have done and the choices I have made, but I also know I don’t like to be the source of anyone else’s envy. Indeed, I am always reluctant to go into any kind of competitive situation with an advantage. But maybe I need to remember that this was not about my telling myself I was better than anyone else. We are all rock stars… we all get to define what rock star status is, and we do not have to accept anyone else’s definition.

If I try to lean into this affirmation to aid me in rekindling my faith in myself as a writer, well, maybe that could work. I am a rock star writer because I am bold enough to spend time writing.

Maybe. It is a struggle right now to imagine writing with confidence. Even worse, it seems to me that when I do so, I generate cliches rather than subtle insights. A lack of confidence helps me interrogate my word choices.

Then again, maybe it’s similar to the mindset of drafting versus the mindset of editing. When I write fresh drafts, I am a rock star. When I am editing, I am a rock star’s manager, rolling my eyes a bit and trying to see what we can salvage.

Either way, I am following my dreams.

Why not embrace the metaphor? I picture myself now standing on a stage, thankfully one of my own creation. I am bathed in the lights, energized by the feeling that this moment could last forever. I am lifted aloft by the words, one after another. When I write, there is nothing else I need.

Rock on.

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Relaxed and happy

So one of my oldest affirmations, or perhaps, quasi-affirmation, or well, if I am honest, this was my mission statement in 1994, so I was young, and this sentence is now violating so many grammar rules that I think I will start again. Ahem. One of my oldest affirmations is “Be relaxed and happy like that woman we met in the grocery store.”

Impressive, hmm? Clear as mud. So a mission statement is a statement of what you want to be in the moment, not what you want to accomplish or possess. Around the time I was developing this mission statement, my now-husband and I ran into this woman he knew in a grocery store, and she was super relaxed and laughing as we chatted with her, and I thought, yes, that’s how I would like to be.

It wasn’t all I wanted to accomplish, but there was something admirable about not tackling every activity with a turbo charge but rather taking a breath and appreciating that which brings joy rather than focusing only on that which elicits sorrow, rage, or despair.

As I mentioned, I am revisiting my affirmations to bolster my commitment to writing, so I might explore briefly what this affirmation could mean for me as a writer. Relaxing instead of writing would not be what I want, but relaxing as I tackle my writing projects could be beneficial. What if I allow my writing to be a way to relax and smile, to celebrate the moment?

Can I make progress on anything if I am relaxed and happy as I work? Such an approach defies the Puritan work ethic. Can the act of writing be something positive and fulfilling? Can some of the issues I want to unpack be serious and consequential, at least to me, yet the work itself still allow me to be relaxed and happy? Can I be a caring, engaged part of the greater community and be relaxed and happy? At least, some of the time?

I know that my being stressed and miserable does not help anyone else, and it tends to undermine my ability to support others or create anything worthwhile. Being relaxed and happy does not mean I am not pursuing ongoing growth and improvement. Nor do I have to pretend that it is possible to be relaxed and happy all the time, nor that writing isn’t sometimes a difficult and frustrating activity. Indeed, as I think about it, what I most need is not necessarily to feel relaxed every time I write, but to relax rather than worry about what I am writing or where it is leading. Or how long it takes to get there.

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#am (almost) writing

Every now and then, I think about trying to be more consistent and predictable in my choice of topics for my blog. A day may come when I succeed, but that day is not this day.

I have been struggling with some doubt and disappointment related to my writing, not to mention skepticism about investing time and energy in the pursuit of publication. One result is that I realize how much I like this blog as a way to share my words among what feels like a supportive and small circle of readers. I like being writer, editor, and publisher on this space, including the chance to go back and edit or even delete as my thinking changes. Traditional publication is like a snapshot of a world that is always in flux, a historical artifact as soon as it is created. Blogging as a form of publication allows for movement.

So I think I will start blogging more often. At the same time, I love writing novels, so I have been journaling lately about how to recommit to this long process that may not, in the end, lead anywhere but still brings my life so much value and meaning.

One thing I have done is reviewed some affirmations that were meaningful for me over the years, and I thought it might make sense to share some of them on the blog. Some make more sense than others, so no telling where this will lead.

America on Trial

First, I want to share Adam Schiff’s closing words from January 24, 2020:

Sometimes I think about how unforgiving history can be of our conduct. We can do a lifetime’s work, draft the most wonderful legislation, help our constituents, and yet we may be remembered for none of that, but for a single decision we may be remembered, affecting the course of our country. I believe this may be one of those moments, a moment we never thought we would see, a moment when our democracy was gravely threatened and not from without but from within. Russia, too, has a constitution. It’s not a bad constitution. It’s just a meaningless one. In Russia, they have trial by telephone. They have the same ostensible rights we do to a trial. They hear evidence and witnesses. But before the verdict is rendered, the judge picks up the telephone and calls the right person to find out how it’s supposed to turn out. Trial by telephone. Is that what we have here? Trial by telephone? Someone on the other end of the phone dictating what this trial should look like. The founders gave us more than words. They gave us inspiration. They may have receded into mythology, but they inspire us still. And more than us, they inspire the rest of the world. They inspire the rest of the world. From their prison cells in Turkey, journalists look to us. From their internment camps in China, they look to us. From their cells in Egypt, those who gathered in Tahrir Square for a better life look to us. From the Philippines, those that were the victims and their families of mass extrajudicial killing. From Elgin prison, they look to us. From all over the world, they look to us. And increasingly, they don’t recognize what they see. It’s a terrible tragedy for them. It’s a worse tragedy for us because there is nowhere else for them to turn. They’re not going to turn to Russia. They’re not going to turn to China. They’re not going to turn to Europe with all of its problems. They look to us because we are still the indispensable nation. They look to us because we have a rule of law. They look to us because no one is above that law. And one of the things that separates us from those people in Elgin prison is the right to a trial. A right to a trial. Americans get a fair trial. And so I ask you, I implore you, give America a fair trial. Give America a fair trial. She’s worth it.

Schiff’s final words are searing. And troubling. I know too well how consistently we have fallen short of what is invoked when he speaks of a fair trial. Justice for all is too often merely justice for the elite. The vote has been suppressed violently, stealthily, and systematically. The structure of our Senate and the electoral college award power based on geography, not population. The brutality of this administration is staggering, but injustice and brutality are not new to our country. What is also not new is that there have been hard-fought victories that we should celebrate and simultaneously losses that exhaust our ability to grieve.

The challenge to live up to the ideals of democracy is not new to this moment. It will always be an ambitious goal that will break our hearts again and again.

In the past, though, when we failed, we could still agree on what we were trying to achieve: democracy, fairness, justice… life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, even if we disagreed on how to achieve these goals. We frequently failed to see what was missing or to include everyone. We must push for a government of the people, by the people, and for the people that actually serves and protects all of its people. Democracy and justice are actions, not outcomes, an endless journey to places we cannot yet imagine.

There are some who claim power due to the absence of perfect outcomes. They say that because promises of democracy and justice were made but not yet attained, we will promise you nothing and you must be content. Since perfect isn’t possible, you have to accept despair and cynicism.

So what is at stake in this impeachment trial is not the question “Are we democratic and just?” That will always be a work in progress.

No, it is something more chilling, dark, and desolate. The question is “Do we still aspire to be democratic and just?”

The defenders of this White House say no.

Next episode?

I rarely binge watch anything. I am more the type to stay up late to finish a good book.

But then Perry Mason showed up on one of our streaming services this winter. This was good news because my mother has lost the ability to operate her TV or to hold a conversation, so when I bring her home for a meal, it helps to find a show she enjoys.

Seems like we watched Perry Mason any chance we got over the years. The joke was that no matter how many times we watched an episode, we never remembered who did it. On the other hand, we knew the killer was usually on the witness stand in the last ten minutes of the episode.

After awhile, I got sucked in and started watching the show on my own. I enjoy mysteries in general, and these stories entertained me. Yes, I roll my eyes, often, at the stereotypes, not to mention the shocking number of affairs between boss and secretary (not Della and Perry, for the record). I also grind my teeth more than once at the sight of Perry or Paul acting as if Della needs their help to walk. In general, these episodes depict a world that never existed, but instead replicate false definitions of gender, race, sexuality, and power. All fair critiques, but I still like the stories, even the cheesiest ones, where Perry intones deep insights like a prophet.

This time, though, I realized watching was a way for me to travel through time. I seem to be climbing into the screen to stare at this city in black and white, the long angular cars, the jazzy street scenes, all depicting a Los Angeles that doesn’t seem quite as endless as what we have now. Not that I know anything about L.A., just my own corner of the world that continues to expand and shift around me.

I took my mother to the eye doctor yesterday. “Hold this over your eye,” she was asked, several times. Eventually, she did.

“Can you tell me what you see?”

No answer.

“What about now?”

Letters changed to pictures.

No response. The questions did not mean anything to her.

It will be her last trip to the eye doctor, at least for an annual check-up. You have to be able to answer questions. You have to read.

Afterwards, I felt gravity pull me down. Maybe if I am smaller. Maybe if I roll myself into a curve so I take up as little space as possible, maybe this won’t hurt so much.

Later I queued up the next episode of Perry Mason. Only five episodes left, the peril of binging. The screen is full of black, white, and gray tones, flickering, fading. There is chaos, but it is predictable. We know at some point, someone will find a body. Usually it’s the defendant, who sometimes gasps and then picks up the murder weapon. It’s hard not to hiss: What are you thinking?

But there will be a trial. Berger will be cranky, but in the end he will be grateful, mostly, that the real criminal is revealed.

There is always a light note at the end of the show. Someone died, someone else will face the death penalty, but there’s always reason to laugh.

Another episode is over, and a small box appears, inviting me to click to watch more. My mouse hovers over the _next_ button. I am running out of episodes.

Whether I click now or later, there are only a few left.

Think Small

The following is an excerpt from the second edition of my e-book on time management, now available on Amazon.

Welcome to the second edition of Time Management: The Basics. My goal is to offer the reader a way to take small steps to manage time more effectively. I have transformed the lengthier discussions from the first edition of this book into short passages that highlight one strategy at a time.

Here’s my deep thought: Anyone who wants to manage time better doesn’t want to spend a lot of time on the process. 

Here’s another deep thought: Success in improving the way you manage your time results from a series of small changes rather than a massive or overwhelming shift in how you spend your time.

Yes, that’s my advice, at least to get us started. Think small.

Thus I provide you with a menu of strategies. Consider reading one strategy at a time and then giving that strategy a try for the day, week, or month. Focus on that one tweak to your routine. I like the word tweak because some of these strategies may not seem new or transformative to you, yet committing or re-committing to them could be beneficial, perhaps in subtle ways.

You don’t have to read these strategies in order. You have my blessing to hop around to whichever strategy calls to you first. 

In addition to including one strategy per section, I end each time with a prompt for reflection. That’s because I don’t think time management works without reflection. That is, you need to spend a few minutes thinking about what is working and what needs to change. Devoting a little time to reflect will help you develop a time management system that works. Once you fine-tune that system through reflection, you may wind up spending less time on the system because the various steps and tools will become a habit, at least for as long as you need them.

Reflect: Take a moment to consider your experiences with time management systems in the past, both paper-based and digital. What worked well? What didn’t? Why?

Second edition, in progress

I have shifted this month from novel-writing to editing my e-book of time management strategies. My first edition of the book was organized in a way that I have decided was not as effective as it should be, especially in e-book format, so I’ve changed the structure and focus considerably for what will be a second edition. I’m nearing the end of my second draft of this re-vision. I am itching to publish the updated version, but I know I need to be patient and work through this book several more times to see what could be improved. Still, I am making progress.

One pleasant effect of revising a book of time management strategies is that it reminds me to “walk the walk,” and I wind up using my time a bit better. On the other hand, December is a tough month. The holidays bring more activities and events, not to mention schedule changes. Snow days can mean the kids are home from school, which usually upends my plans for the day. It seems almost an exercise in irony to spend this month writing about how to boost productivity.

Then again, time management is not about living a perfect life. It’s just about expanding the possibilities.

50,891!

Hoorah! I am happy to report that I crossed the 50k line in National Novel Writing Month. It’s definitely a rough draft, but the month yielded so much in terms of new insights into what might happen in this novel, and I successfully added flesh and structure to what used to be mostly notes and fragments. So that’s pretty cool.

This November felt different because I have a nonfiction deadline that I’ve been working towards, so I could not fully immerse in the novel. I am pleased that I made good progress on both, but I hope to arrange things differently next November.

I have been pondering next steps but will talk about those in another blog post. For now, I just want to celebrate crossing the finish line! Best wishes to all the other Wrimos out there, and thank you to all of you who cheered me along this month.

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Light at the end of the Nano Tunnel

I have not found much time to write in the blog this November, even though I enjoy the chance to talk about process and progress on here with anyone else trying to write more words as part of National Novel Writing Month.

My current total is 44,184 words, yahoo! It feels as if I will, more or less, reach the end of this novel by the time I break 50,000, even though we all know that 50,000 isn’t exactly the length of a typical novel. I don’t even think it’s the right ball park for a young adult novel, which is my current project. Still, it is nice to feel like I’ve written from start to finish, even if it’s a very rough and short draft of a novel.

Once again, though, the process of writing a novel in a month (add air quotes) has yielded many insights into what could or should happen to my novel. I also created a folder in the Research section of my Scrivener file labeled “Fixes for Later.” As I fast draft this novel, I realize there are some parts that need changes, some minor names or background fodder, and some more significant. There’s no time now, but I try to capture those ideas as I go since I will likely forget later.

I hope those of you who have aimed to write more this month have made progress, regardless of word count. And let us all cross our fingers as we enter (at least in the U.S.) holiday season that we will still get a few more words written. In my case, here’s hoping I find time to squeeze in 6000 more by November 30th. Part of me hopes I knock it out in the next day or so, but I have to admit, the secret to my success this year has been to take it slow & steady, averaging 1700 words a day.

Write on, everyone.

40k word screenshot

Screen shot on the Nanowrimo website when I logged in a total of over 40,000 words.

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Back on track

I have been juggling multiple commitments lately because, as I feared, life would not screech to a halt just because it’s National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), so I’ve watched my progress falter on the novel. I tried not to pout and to appreciate the good things that were happening in my life that have nothing to do with the novel, but you know, it’s all about the word count.

I also wisely made myself take just a little time to ponder the plot points and articulate what scenes might fill in some gaps, also discovering the need for a few new scenes based on what I’ve already written. Once I had the right focus, it was easier than I thought to get going.

I’ve also been noticing that having a word count goal is helpful if I generally know what I want to write because it encourages me to flesh out parts that I might otherwise want to skip. So that’s been cool.

At any rate, I am now at 20,322 words, which is a couple hundred above par, which means if I can keep up this pace, I will reach 50,000 words by the end of November. In general, I find that writing around 1700 words a day is very manageable, so I just need to keep at it. It’s the catching up that is harder on me.

I have had to spend less time on the blog, but that’s okay. I will pop in when I can.

I also did find that I could take some notes and make progress just typing into my phone when I found myself having to wait around yesterday, so that’s a good feeling. I always know in theory that I could use my phone as a way to catch ideas or write a short draft on the go, but somehow in practice I never do. But thanks to this random word count goal, I’m all in.

Hope your November is going well for you, word count or otherwise!