1619 Project: Kruse

I continue to read, reflect, and shine a spotlight on the essays in the New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project. Princeton University professor Kevin Kruse, who I know as That-History-Guy-on-Twitter, wrote an essay titled: “What does a traffic jam in Atlanta have to do with segregation? Quite a lot” A quote that resonated for meContinue reading “1619 Project: Kruse”

1619 Project: Morris

I am the type to read the book before I see the movie, and I tried to do something similar with the podcasts for the 1619 series, which both encompass and differ from the essays they address. But I accidentally hit play on the third podcast on “The Birth of American Music” before reading WesleyContinue reading “1619 Project: Morris”

1619 Project: Poems and Stories

I continue to read, reflect, and shine a spotlight on the New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project. Typically I rely on the titles as a kind of summary for the essays, and I pull out a quote or two that resonated with me. That won’t work for today’s readings, which were poems and stories byContinue reading “1619 Project: Poems and Stories”

1619 Project: Bouie

I continue to read, reflect, and shine a spotlight on the work of the 1619 Project. Today I read the work by Jamelle Bouie, titled “America holds onto an undemocratic assumption from its founding: that some people deserve more power than others.” You can read it in full at this link: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/republicans-racism-african-americans.html Again, I hopeContinue reading “1619 Project: Bouie”

1619 Project: Villarosa’s article

I continue to read, reflect, and spotlight pieces in the New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project. Today I read Linda Villarosa’s article entitled, Myths about physical racial differences were used to justify slavery — and are still believed by doctors today. As I’ve mentioned, I want to avoid summarizing these works, though it does feelContinue reading “1619 Project: Villarosa’s article”

1619 Project: Desmond’s Essay

Today I continue to read, reflect, and shine a spotlight on the 1619 Project, a series of articles in the New York Times Magazine. Today I read Matthew Desmond’s essay titled “If you want to understand the brutality of American capitalism, you have to start on the plantation.” As I have in previous posts, IContinue reading “1619 Project: Desmond’s Essay”

1619 Project: Hannah-Jones

It is my firm belief that any time Ms. Nikole Hannah-Jones has something to say, I need to listen. Indeed, she says everything that needs to be said, with both precision and artistry, in the first article in the 1619 series in the New York Times Magazine. So instead of describing her article at all,Continue reading “1619 Project: Hannah-Jones”

History versus Fairy Tales

So my goal is to explain what resonated with me in the introduction to the Times’ 1619 Project (which I intend to continue to read/reflect upon in a few upcoming blog posts). Here, again, is what I quoted yesterday: It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing theContinue reading “History versus Fairy Tales”

The 1619 Project in the New York Times Magazine

One of my goals has been to return to a special series in the New York Times Magazine called the 1619 Project published in August 2019 and use my blog as a place to reflect more on each piece. Here is the link to this series: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html  I hope you will consider reading it, too.Continue reading “The 1619 Project in the New York Times Magazine”